Robert Kellogg, MD

  • Assistant Professor

Robert Kellogg, MD, joined the Department of Neurological Surgery, as an assistant professor in September of 2020 specializing in pediatric neurosurgery. His clinical and research interests include the comprehensive management of spasticity and movement disorders and craniofacial surgery.

Dr. Kellogg grew up in Connecticut but has spent most of the last decade in the Chicago area. He is married and has two sons. Dr. Kellogg received his medical education from Indiana University School of Medicine and did his internship and residency training in neurological surgery at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Dr. Kellogg completed a pediatric neurosurgery fellowship at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

Dr. Kellogg's publications can be reviewed through the National Library of Medicine's publication database.

Specialized Areas of Interest

Spasticity and movement disorders; EEA/pituitary tumors; back/spine pain; craniofacial/ craniosynostosis; plagiocephaly.

Board Certifications

American Board of Neurological Surgery
American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery

Hospital Privileges

UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh
UPMC Magee Womens Hospital

Professional Organization Membership

American Association of Neurological Surgeons
AANS/CNS Joint Section on Pediatric Neurosurgery
Congress of Neurological Surgeons

Education & Training

  • BA, Indiana University, 2005
  • MD, Indiana University School of Medicine, 2009
  • Residency, Rush University Medical Center, 2015
  • Fellowship, University of Pittsburgh, 2016

Research Activities

Dr. Kellogg is in the process of reviewing UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh’s experience regarding management of spasticity and dystonia with intrathecal and intraventricular baclofen pumps including complications. Additionally, he is analyzing and will report CHP’s extensive selective dorsal rhizotomy experience. 

Dr. Kellogg is also co-investigator on a multi-center clinical trial to assess the feasibility of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in pediatric brain tumor patients. The goal is to have this trial up and running in early 2022.